Other Egyptian Sites:

 

Pyramids.

Precession.

The Giza Plateau.

Archaeoastronomy.

 

Egypt Homepage.

Index of Ancient Sites.

Homepage.

 Ancient Wisdom Jewelry 

 

 
 

 

Share/Bookmark

Homepage.

About Us.

A-Z Site Index.

Gift Shop.

Contact Us

 

      The Khufu Calendar: (By András Göczey)

In the common opinion of Egyptologists, the small pyramids next to the great pyramid of Khufu served as burial places for the relatives of the Pharaoh. Certain facts, which have not been previously considered, indicate that there is a chance that the pyramids — due to their ground plan arrangement — are not only burial places but also the components of a yearly calendar. This is the opinion of Hungarian architect András Göczey.

The northernmost of the three queens pyramids was that of Hetepheres, the middle one was that of Meritetes while the southernmost one was that of Hanutsen. They are all in a ruined state today.

 

As a result of the position of the Ghiza Necropolis on the 30 degrees latitude the rays of the rising Sun accurately indicate the direction of due east at the time of the autumnal and vernal equinoxes; while the Sunrise is directed 28 degrees to the north of this (i.e. N62şE) at the time of the summer solstice and 28 degrees to the south of this (i.e. S62şE) at the time of the winter solstice.

Image copyright: András Göczey.

The distance of SP and apex of Meritetes is 110 m, the distance between the apexes of Meritetes and Hetepheres  is 59,25 m by Wikipedia. (59,25/110 is appr. 28 degrees)

If, at the time of equinox in both spring and autumn, the rays of rising sun hit the apex of the middle pyramid (Meritetes) horizontally then in spring the shadow of this apex marks a prominently important shade point (SP) on the south-eastern inclined side of the great pyramid of Khufu and in autumn appears in the proximity thereof. The straight line connecting the projection of this SP location to the projection of the apex of the Meritetes pyramid on the ground plan determines an accurate east-west direction. If a straight line is drawn from the SP (shade point) at an angle of N62şE (i.e. 62 degrees to the east measured from due north), this straight line intersects the apex of the northernmost pyramid (Hetepheres).

 

The Basic 'Khufu Calendar' principles.

'By means of this sensibly made project, the most important four dates of the year were determined'. (1)

Image copyright: András Göczey.

At the  the time of the summer solstice (the beginning of the year) and now only the shadow of the northernmost small pyramid of Hetepheres appears on the shadow point date marker. The  apex shadow point of Hetepheres starts moving to the North 77-59 cm a day.

 

Image copyright: András Göczey.

At the time of the autumnal equinox, i.e. the 21st of September, the apex of the pyramid of Meritetes appears to coincide with the indicated shadow point date marker, with the shadow of Hetepheres near it. The apex shadow point of Meritetes starts moving to the North 59-77 cm a day. At the time of the vernal equinox, i.e the 21st of March, the apex of the pyramid of Meritetes appears to coincide with the indicated shadow point date marker, with the shadow of Hetepheres near it. The  apex shadow point of Hetepheres starts moving back to the South 59-77 cm a day.

 

Image copyright: András Göczey.

At  the time of the winter solstice the shadow of the southernmost small pyramid of Hanutsen appears near the shadow point date marker with the shadows of Meritetes and Hetepheres. The apex shadow point of Meritetes starts moving back to the South 77-59 cm a day.

 

Thus, the midsummer is indicated by the shadow of a small pyramid while the deep of winter is indicated by the shadow of three pyramids. At the time of equinox, exactly two shadows of pyramid are shown!

(Copyright: All the above information is copyrighted by András Göczey)

 

 

(Contact: András Göczey for more information)

 

(Archaeoastronomy)

(Astronomy at the Giza Plateau)

(Egyptian Astronomy)

(Egyptian Geodesy)

 

(The Giza Plateau)

(Egypt Homepage)

 

 

References:

1). András Göczey. The Khufu Calendar Theory. Personal Correspondence. 2010.

 

 

About Us Homepage  |  A-Z Site Index  |  Gift Shop  |  Contact-Us